Twenty-eight years! Why did we wait so long to tie the knot? Well, it wasn’t legal until June 26, of 2015. But we could have had a non-legally binding commitment ceremony or filed to be a civil union years ago.  But another way to look at it is, why get married at all? It won’t change who we are and what we feel for each other, not really. Is it for the benefits? Sure, that’s a small part of it. Is it to declare our love for each other, and announce it to the world? Okay, that too. Part of the matter is, and this is why we’ve waited so long, and why we’re doing it at all: same sex partners have fought hard for the right to marry. It was a stunning achievement, something nearly unthinkable 28 years ago, certainly unthinkable when I was a boy growing up in the blue-collar mill town of Manchester, New Hampshire, in the 1970s.  By David Morse - New America Dimensions

2016 may very well be remembered as the year that America’s racial divide became undone. The ubiquity of shootings of unarmed black men.  The ascent of Black Lives Matter, not to mention Blue Lives Matter and All Lives Matter.  The candidacy of Donald J. Trump and its nativist, prejudiced rhetoric.  Pick any random evening, turn on the nightly news, and you are sure to see evidence that, especially in racial terms, the country seems to be coming apart at the seams.  By David Morse - New America Dimensions

Science has a shady history when it comes to racial matters.  Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, science, particularly anthropology, was used to justify white domination, and the history books are chockfull of examples of scientists using scientific inquiry to “demonstrate” the superiority of Caucasians.  In the United States, eugenics – the science that deals with the improvement of hereditary qualities of a race or breed – was popularized in the 1890s, and high school and college textbooks from the 1920s through the 1940s often had chapters touting the social progress to be made from applying eugenics toward undesirable racial populations.   By David Morse - New America Dimensions

In 2012, Pew Research Center published a glowing report on the state of Asians in the United States that was met by widespread criticism by Asian-American activists.  Highlights included a median household income of $66,000 for Asian Americans, compared to $49,800 for Americans as a whole, and Asian-American median household wealth at $83,500 vs. $68,529 for the U.S. population. By David Morse - New America Dimensions

With Hispanic Heritage Month in full swing, the Immigrant Archive Project and DishLATINO are teaming up to digitally showcase the stories of Latino immigrants who left their home countries to build a new life in the United States.

Telemundo will honor Pitbull with the first ever “Latin AMA Dick Clark Achievement Award” at the upcoming third annual “Latin American Music Awards” (Latin AMAs).

Whenever our nation is facing difficult times, whether natural disasters or mass shootings, we all come together to take care of our own.  It is in our DNA and part of what makes the United States great. There is a humanitarian crisis that is threatening the lives of millions of U.S. citizens in Puerto Rico and the time for action is now.  By Randy Falco, President & Chief Executive Officer, Univision Communications

Nativism, a kind-of political “first come, first served” resentment toward the latest wave of immigrants, haunts American history during periods of demographic change fueling fear, anger, and resentment.  By David Morse / New American Dimensions

We Americans are obsessed with race. Turn on the news on any given day and you’re sure to be presented with the latest racial incident. Maybe a celebrity said something he or she should not have about race. Maybe the theme is the latest racial profiling incident.  Regrettably, in 2016, it might be the latest African-American man shot by a police officer.  By David Morse / New American Dimensions

A new display opening Sept. 12 within the museum's "American Enterprise" exhibition will explore advertising history through the lens of Tejano singer Selena Quintanilla-Perez (1971 – 1995). In the 1960s and 1970s, Latinos in advertising and Spanish-language broadcasting began advocating for the buying power of Latino consumers. This exhibition case looks at the transition the advertising industry made from mass market to targeting specific demographic groups.

Univision Communications Inc. (UCI) announced it has entered into a new partnership with language education powerhouse Rosetta Stone Inc. The two companies have come together to debut Univision Aprender con Rosetta Stone, a new language learning program to help the Hispanic audience gain English-language proficiency.

Every now in then in your life you need to take some time off and travel along the mystic side of the river trail for whatever reason.  My case, a full knee replacement last week, a TV and an iPhone.  Watching TV with an elevated leg that I was icing aggressively after therapy, I came across a documentary on Starz Network about a 1970s trovador out of Detroit of Mexican decent called Rodriguez that frequented the local dive bars and belted out lyric and tunes that motivated the day that would make Bob Dylan look “more’ than twice.  By Gene Bryan / HispanicAd

By Gonzalo López Martí - Creative director, etc   /  LMMiami.com

  • I was reading the news about the attacks last week in Spain* and it was brought to my attention that some European media outlets call these type of assailants “Nike terrorists”.
  • “Nike terrorist”?
  • What can that possibly mean?
  • Here’s what I found after some research online.
  • Apparently, the term was coined by operatives in the British intelligence services.
  • For various reasons, some of them surprisingly related to our marketing & advertising line of business.

María Elena Salinas, an influential voice in television and Hispanic America for more than three decades, announced that she plans to leave the Univision News anchor chair at the end of the year.

Latinos have been part of the democratic process of permanently protecting millions of acres of public lands for their communities and for future generations. For example, the Latino community were active participants in the efforts to establish the Sand to Snow, Mojave Trails and San Gabriel Mountains National Monuments in California, Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument in New Mexico, Gold Butte National Monument in Nevada, and many other places.

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