All it takes is an “essential” trip to the grocery store to recognize we’re living in a strange time. Masked shoppers do a solemn dance, keeping a 6-foot distance and communicating who has the go-ahead with a brief nod and averted eyes.

The resounding question advertisers are asking right now is if they should advertise. In fact, many advertisers have chosen to reduce their ad volumes and spend—whether that’s due to the pandemic’s economic impact on businesses or as a choice to dissociate from wall-to-wall coverage of death and infection. However, this strategy of limiting advertising is not sustainable with coverage of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) here to stay for at least the medium term. And reducing advertising now could have long-term consequences.

Personalization has been around for the better part of 20 years, and the superior performance it provides is well documented. However, social distancing measures imposed on most of the world in 2020 as a result of the coronavirus pandemic have already deeply affected advertising strategies. In fact, Innovid's recently released "Global Video Benchmarks Report 2020" confirms a new era of personalization has already begun. The data shows an acceleration of consumer impressions shifting away from desktops and laptops to connected TV (CTV). As a result, marketers need to expand beyond traditional display formats to create targeted, valuable omnichannel experiences with an emphasis on CTV.

VAB's Keep Calm and Advertise On: How to Successfully Navigate Your Brand Through An Economic Downturn, is a new, comprehensive analysis of data spanning the 1920s through present day, identifying the correlation between advertising investment and business outcomes during periods of economic upheaval due to global health crises and recession.

Consumer spending tumbled a record 16.4% in April as #COVID19 continues to impact the U.S. economy. KPMG Senior Economist Ken Kim breaks down today’s record decline and whether there are signs that perhaps April be the trough in consumer spending.

It’s Asian American Pacific Heritage Month, and despite the current crisis, Asian Americans have much to celebrate. For years, this fast-growing, highly diverse multicultural group has been largely ignored by marketers, for reasons varying from “too many diverse subcultures” to “too many different languages” to “the general market advertising will reach them.” We’re seeing that now, more than ever before, Asian Americans are a galvanized group (the fastest-growing multicultural group in the U.S. with a buying power of $1.2 trillion), presenting more opportunities for brands to build trust and an emotional connection with them.

How does the Puerto Rican consumer feel about buying right now? What can brands do to encourage consumption? We asked 200 Puerto Ricans and here's what they said…

With the recent demand fluctuations caused by the Great Lockdown many brands have focused on driving short-term volume but to grow market share in the longer-term, brands must gain more than their fair share of category entrants. The latter growth mechanism is facilitated by making sure new category entrants are predisposed to choose your brand, and do not just do so because it is easily available.  by Nigel Hollis

Marketers are pretty intimate with content marketing metrics, data, and analytics these days—and if you’re not, you’d best get learning.  By Lauren McMenemy

There are several ways to employ Cultural Insights to help brands gain the right amount of Cultural Intelligence to solve for larger questions. When the right cultural insights methods are utilized, marketers are able to create solutions for today, and also plan for how their category will likely be shaped in the near future.  By Whitney Dunlap-Fowler

In 2017, we worked with Nielsen to develop the Secrets of Spanish Language TV ROI report, which was critical in highlighting the key variables that optimize ROI with Spanish-language media campaigns.  By Roberto Ruiz, EVP - Research, Insights and Analytics at Univision

Unprecedented times like these bring massive challenges. Yet even during a crisis like the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, businesses need to consider strategic plans and continue to invest in their brands. While sales may be down, it’s important to maintain—or increase—your share of the market. Continuing to invest in advertising will help set your company up for success when life eventually settles into a new normal.

In this research we explore consumers’media consumption habits during the outbreak of coronavirus. We dig deeper into what media people are consuming more of (and plan to continue after the crisis ends), what sources of information they find most trustworthy generally and on social media, whattheywant to see more of in news coverage, their willingness to pay for trustworthy information, and what they expect from sports leagues at this time.

In just a week’s time, the Coronavirus pandemic has completely upended the globe. It has had substantial effects on people’s lives and livelihoods, and it has entirely transformed the way companies do business. In the advertising industry, we’ve all felt the immediate effects: Cancelled events, meetings and business trips. Work-from-home mandates that include hunkering down inside our houses and apartments alongside our entire families. And yes, even paused and pulled advertising campaigns.

H Code released The Hispanic Healthcare Report, the first resource exclusively revealing Hispanic preferences and attitudes towards the current state of healthcare in light of the COVID-19 outbreak and 2020 U.S. presidential election cycle.

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