Latino voters are less likely than all U.S. voters to say they are extremely motivated to vote in the upcoming presidential election, with the Latino electorate expressing less interest overall in the presidential campaigns, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted Sept. 30-Oct. 5.
About half of Latino voters say they are ‘extremely motivated’ to vote for president in 2020

Research from the Brennan Center for Justice and other advocacy organizations shows that Black Americans still have to confront unique barriers in order to cast their ballots. From reduced oversight of changes in voting laws to the ongoing threat of a global pandemic, Black voters have even more to contend with this election year. Despite historic obstacles and new challenges, Blacks take their right to vote seriously and have some of the highest rates of turnout in the country.

With the largest number of eligible voters of any minority voting group, Latinos represent over 13% of all eligible voters in the U.S according to the Pew Research Center. But the number of Hispanics who actually vote still has room to grow. Only half of the eligible Hispanic voters were registered in 2018 but that gap has been closing as registration rates are climbing for the 32 million eligible Latino voters in 2020 as we approach this Presidential Election.

A generation, according Howe & Strauss, is defined by a life cycle—or roughly 20 years—and greatly influence a nation’s mood. Thrust between a pandemic, racial justice movements and an election, the United States is in the middle of a social and demographic transformation, making 2020 a critical turning point year. But that is not all...2020 marks the  rst time any American generation is a multicultural majority. Today, it is the 0 to 17 segment. By 2028, it will be the under 35 segment, and by 2033, everyone under the age of 50 will be a multicultural majority.

It is only 60 days until the election, and the first absentee ballots are going out today. The tension is only going to continue to build over the next two months; amplification is the operative word. And life, and our data, bring into clear relief our polar world—Red, Blue; Good, Bad; Rich, Poor; Black, White. We are divided as a nation. Perhaps our only unity is in our agreement of disunity. What did Thomas Paine say? —"these are the times that try (our) souls…”

A study in contrasts: Republican and Democratic strengths and weaknesses in party identificationRepublicans hold wide advantages in party identification among several groups of voters, including white men without a college degree, people living in rural communities in the South and those who frequently attend religious services.  Democrats hold formidable advantages among a contrasting set of voters, such as black women, residents of urban communities in the Northeast and people with no religious affiliation.

Most people are surprised to learn that nearly 30% of U.S. Hispanics voted for Trump in 2016. Hispanics, it turns out, are not a homogeneous group. Over 50% are U.S. born with roots in 20 countries of origin, each with its own rich cultural and political heritage. The world, however, has changed considerably since 2016. Voters have a clearer idea of the president’s policy priorities and leadership style.

More than 23 million U.S. immigrants will be eligible to vote in the 2020 presidential election, making up roughly 10% of the nation’s overall electorate – both record highs, according to Pew Research Center estimates based on Census Bureau data.

Thanks to billionaire Michael Bloomberg, television ad spending in the 2020 presidential contest has spiked to unprecedented levels. Well over half a billion dollars ($626 million) has been spent so far, with Bloomberg splashing out more half the total ($333 million), and fellow billionaire Tom Steyer dropping another $157 million. Taken altogether, the Democrats have spent 96 percent of the total to date—with President Donald Trump’s essentially uncontested primary campaign spending a comparatively paltry $18 million dollars (and an outside group supporting his re-election kicking in an additional $4 million). In comparison, even with competitive contests in both parties, only $269 million (through 2/15/2016) had been spent at this point in 2016.

This year, Latinos are expected for the first time to be the nation’s largest racial or ethnic minority in a U.S. presidential election, with a record 32 million projected to be eligible to vote. They will account for 13.3% of all eligible voters. However, the number of Latino eligible voters is still far below the 60 million Latinos who live in the country.

As the U.S. enters a heated 2020 presidential election year, a new Pew Research Center report finds that Republicans and Democrats place their trust in two nearly inverse news media environments.  

New words stick when they come from below, and respond to a real need.
 

The winner of the 2020 Presidential Election will need to reach 270 electoral votes. Getting to that number will mean understanding who's voting and who's not, and who can be engaged, so they'll turn out at the polls. Whether you want to engage in a "get out the vote" campaign, or focus messaging efforts in key swing states, you'll want to tune in each month as we explore voters and their role on the road to election 2020.

By Gonzalo López Martí  - Creative director, etc / lmmiami.com

  • A new era of northbound Hispanic immigration is around the corner.
  • Which America will welcome with, mostly, open arms.
  • Here’s why.

In June, I posted two RAB blog posts regarding the upcoming 2020 elections. I stated that PQ Media is forecasting $8.33 billion is going to be spent by candidates and their PACs, as well as by special interest groups supporting/not supporting ballot initiatives or referendums. Radio was predicted to do well, fueled by candidates targeting multicultural audiences.  By Leo Kivijarv, Ph.D., Executive Vice President & Director of Research, PQ Media

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