Simmons Research announced the release of its Sports Fan Engagement Study, a trusted solution that provides in-depth insights into sports fandom in the United States.

Technology-driven structural change is afoot: driverless cars,  robots at work, AI fueled investing, learning, decision-making.  Millennials are taking charge as the largest generation in the workforce. These phenomena are no longer far out on the horizon but are here today.

According to a series of recent online surveys conducted in the U.S., Mexico, and Canada by Ipsos on behalf of the United Bid Committee, just over half (55%) of all adults report having watched the men’s international soccer/ football tournament known as the ('FIFA' in Canada) World Cup in the past. However, viewership in Mexico (83%) is nearly twice as high compared to the U.S. (45%) and Canada (47%) – including a significantly greater proportion of adults in Mexico who say that they are avid watchers of past World Cup matches (33% vs. 17% U.S. and 11% Canada).

Music is a big part of daily life and special occasions for most Hispanic consumers. According to our annual Music 360 report, 93% of the Hispanic population (age 13+) in the U.S. listened to music in the past year, and 59% consider music important, compared with 51% of the general population.

MKTG's Decoding 2.0 Study uncovers the vast differences in how fans in the US receive sponsor messaging around sport and lifestyle properties.

Common Sense announced the release of The Common Sense Census: Media Use by Kids Age Zero to Eight, the third installment in an ongoing series of national surveys tracking the use of media and technology among U.S. children from birth to age 8. Among the key findings is the spike in the number of young children who have their own tablet device (now 42 percent, up from 1 percent in 2011) and the amount of time children age 0 to 8 are spending with mobile devices (48 minutes, up from just five minutes in 2011).

Hispanics are a group of individuals who are heavily influenced by people in their close network. Like most individuals, their actions and behaviors are affected by those who they identify with and deem trustworthy. With regard to Hispanics, the role of reference groups in influencing their consumer behavior across acculturation levels is important, as many of these individuals have no experience in the American market or have never seen these brands before. They depend on those they trust and those who are knowledgeable to guide them while they learn and establish their own consumer behavior pattern.  By Maria Puente and Sean Sawicki - Florida State University / Center for Hispanic Marketing Communication

The job of managing the amount of data available to marketers has become too big for humans alone to handle. If marketers haven’t yet handed off some data management tasks to machines, they undoubtedly will soon. Allen Nance, global CMO at marketing automation firm Emarsys, spoke with eMarketer’s Sean Creamer about what artificial intelligence (AI) does best, while leaving human marketers to refocus on connecting with consumers.

In the world of innovation, there’s a clear line of separation between a concept and a product. A concept represents what you plan to offer; it’s a helpful tool for prioritizing features and claims and for determining how to communicate the product’s benefits. It also informs ideal price points and which varieties will be needed to drive trial. On the other hand, a product is a tangible object that consumers purchase and use; its long-term success (i.e., repeated purchasing) relies heavily on the experience that consumers have with it.

Latino small-business owners say they expect to have much higher revenues, hire more employees and are focused on attracting millennial customers, according to a new survey results from U.S. Bank.

Earning college degrees remains a challenge for Latinos: only 21 percent of Latinos have bachelor’s degrees compared to 32 percent of blacks and 45 percent of whites. Latino Education and Economic Progress: Running Faster but Still Behind, a new study from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce (Georgetown Center), reveals that lagging college degree attainment has led Latinos to become stuck in the middle-wage tiers of the labor market.

There is not one simple definition so there is not one simple strategy to reach them, and connect.  The 37-year-old Millennial is … everything you’d expect from a millennial, and in some cases more.

With culture at the very heart of the identity of different groups across the country, the United States has become very diverse with regard to the different groups that comprise it. As such, Hispanics have become a very unique group to market to within the United States. Targeting this demographic is a distinct task, as the group itself is often mistaken to be one homogeneous culture. However, although Hispanics share many ideals, it is important to remember that each group that comprises Hispanics contains its respective identity; and, with these groups having generational identities within them, marketers are tasked with creating campaigns that acknowledge their unique identity while embracing the different values that they share.  By Sean Sawicki / Florida State University

The results are an eye-opener for marketers and their brands as they show how marketers' societal biases and age-related stereotypes are contributing to a significant overestimating of millennial spending power and an underestimating of the value of consumers 55 and older.

In 2012, Pew Research Center published a glowing report on the state of Asians in the United States that was met by widespread criticism by Asian-American activists.  Highlights included a median household income of $66,000 for Asian Americans, compared to $49,800 for Americans as a whole, and Asian-American median household wealth at $83,500 vs. $68,529 for the U.S. population. By David Morse - New America Dimensions

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