Direct-to-consumer (DTC) pharma marketing used to be simple: Run a TV spot on news or late-night talk shows and wait for consumers to contact their doctors.

Everyone knows that to get noticed in today’s frenetic media environment you have to pick a side and argue your case as vehemently as possible. That strategy might spawn a negative reaction, but then they say there is no such thing as bad publicity. But what if making hyperbolic assertions is undermining the effective practice of marketing?  by Nigel Hollis

I recently went to the grocery store with my 7-year-old daughter for our weekly grocery shopping. I am trying to get her to become more autonomous and independent, so we had two shopping lists—a smaller one for her and the longer one for me. In terms of selection, I granted her the liberty to choose whatever product/brand she likes as long as she stuck to the list.  By Smruti Kulkarni Shanbhag, Nielsen Design Solutions - Europe Lead

Personalization is teetering on the edge of the buzzword precipice. But companies that can figure out what it really means and how to take advantage of it are already outstripping their competition.

The scene: 100,000 years ago in Africa. Ancient humans, looking to organize for protection and survival, build off of a common framework — the first language. This allowed them to find each other, to hunt and gather, and to seek shelter from the elements as a community.  By Philip Kinzler

Millennials have been the focus of advertisers, retailers and media for over a decade, but as influential as this group has been, meeting millennials' expectations has proven difficult.  

In his latest blog post, Byron Sharp has some pretty strong words to say about brand tracking. As usual, there is lots in his post that is true and important to say, but not that much that is as new or challenging as the headline suggests.  by Josh Samuel

When The Hershey Company brand Reese's Pieces was featured in the 1982 hit film E.T., sending sales soaring, the use of product placement in movies and TV shifted into high gear. Who could forget the association of Aston Martin with James Bond, or Nike with Forrest Gump?

I was going to write about the Facebook/Google duopoly, but I got sidetracked by this question: If Google and Facebook are a duopoly, what is the market they are controlling?  by Gord Hotchkiss

In a previous post I mentioned that there were some disturbing trends lurking in WARC’s analysis of campaign trends from this year’s Cannes Lions. To my mind those trends say a lot about the sorry state of marketing practice today.  by Nigel Hollis

Rising internet penetration, denser urban locations, faster paced lifestyles and challenging working hours are adding more and more layers of complexity to consumers’ lives. According to the World Health Organization, “workplace stress is the health epidemic of the 21st century,” and multiple agencies have tracked the steady rise of anxiety related illnesses around the world. Consumers are feeling more stretched than ever before, and are increasingly striving for convenient solutions which help to simplify their busy lives.

Determining audience “identity” has become a major priority over the past year for U.S. marketers, many of whom plan to increase their investment in finding and developing identity solutions.

Johnson’s has radically transformed its 124-year-old brand to meet the needs and preferences of modern parents.

It sometimes seems as if we’re living in a post-trust age, when nothing and no one is beyond question or reproach. Granted, there are plenty of people and organizations that have been guilty of abusing our trust, and the damage can be serious.

Personalized communication with every customer is the future of marketing. McKinsey partners Julien Boudet and Kai Vollhardt say it’s easier than many marketers think, if you begin with the data you have.  By Julien Boudet and Kai Vollhardt

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