Today, 36% of U.S. Hispanic adults are bilingual. This includes 25% who mainly use English and 38% who mainly use Spanish. Even among those who primarily speak English, over half consider themselves bilingual

Black consumers are young, influential and hungry for personalized experiences.

On the heels of startling news of declining in-store sales earlier this year by popular brands and an overall sluggish retail environment, new research reveals that the current situation may not be as dire as it seems.

Hispanic women are rapidly becoming an economic and social powerhouse in the United States, with rising rates of entrepreneurship, educational attainment and delayed marriage, according to Latina 2.0: Fiscally Conscious, Culturally Influential & Familia Forward, a Nielsen report released just before the start of Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 to October 15).

If a campaign delivered 50 GRPs but didn't have a mechanism for measuring ROI, did it simultaneously overperform and underperform? For years, marketers didn't have the tools to provide an answer.

In September 1968, Congress authorized President Lyndon B. Johnson to proclaim National Hispanic Heritage Week, observed during the week that included Sept. 15 and Sept. 16. In 1989, Congress expanded the observance to a month long celebration (Sept. 15-Oct. 15) of the culture and traditions of those who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America and the Caribbean.

Immigrant women boosted the annual number of births nationwide and in all but two U.S. states – California and Rhode Island – between 1990 and 2015, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of National Center for Health Statistics data.

A study from consulting firm L.E.K. suggests that while there are parallels and similarities with previous generations, and while certain aspects of millennial behaviors are mostly a reflection of life stage and not unique their particular generation, there are also some clear differences as well.

This report, created by Havas Media and shared with the 4A’s community, estimates media inflation rates for the second half of 2017 and first half of 2018.

Question: what happens when you cross Samba TV’s data from Smart TVs in 13.5 million U.S. households with Kantar Millward Brown’s 8 million Ignite Network® desktop panelists and 3 million mobile panelists? Answer: the opportunity to precisely measure the brand impact of TV advertising on the same basis as digital.  by Nigel Hollis

According to Nielsen’s National Television Household Universe Estimates, there are 119.6 million TV homes in the U.S. for the 2017-18 TV season.  The number of persons age 2 and older in U.S. TV Households is estimated to be 304.5 million, which represents a 0.9% increase from last year. Increases in U.S. Hispanic, black and Asian households were also seen, due to estimated increases in population growth and TV penetration.

Millennials are often the most stereotyped, yet coveted, group for marketers. The second-largest generation group in the U.S. has now “grown up,” and its consumers have disposable incomes. This provides a plethora of opportunities for advertisers and marketers who are so eager to reach them, as Millennials are highly engaged, using multiple platforms for many hours on a daily basis.

We get this question a lot. Truth be told, there’s no one simple answer; content creators can decide to pull the plug on a program for any number of reasons. Still, many cancellations reflect a lack of audience interest—or not enough interest to support the expense of producing the show.

 

In the 1970s and '80s, agencies would seek to fulfill client business and marketing goals on TV by grouping prospects into broad descriptions of desired gender and age, say “women 18-45” for a new laundry detergent, with which they could negotiate with any one of the three -- then four -- broadcast networks. Frankly, although data has become the new lingua franca, this process is still very common.

Whether people in the United States believe they can thrive economically in a digitally disrupted world depends strongly on the amount of education they’ve attained, according to a new survey.  By Don Baer, worldwide chair and CEO of Burson-Marsteller

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